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Posts Tagged ‘art reproduction’

La Grenouillere

Having just come back from Giverny, I thought I’d have to include a post on Monet having seen his wonderful gardens and house. Monet’s & Renoir’s paintings of La Grenouillere really interest me as we’ve done art reproductions of both and they’re surprisingly different.  Surprising, as they painted their paintings at the same time on the same day whilst they were together one Sunday.  La Grenouillere actually means ‘the frog pond’ and was a popular spot for young Parisians to dance and go for a swim. The round floating dock in the centre of both paintings was called ‘le camembert’ because it reminded them of the French cheese.

Monet’s La Grenouillere

Monet La Grenouillére

Monet's La Grenouillére

Renoir’s La Grenouillere

Renoir La Grenouillere

Renoir's La Grenouillere

As you can see from looking at the two paintings even though Monet and Renoir have painted the same scene, they are remarkably different.  For instance, Monet has captured two ladies in long swimming costumes, which you can’t see in Renoir’s painting.  Whilst, if you look carefully at Renoir’s La Grenouillere, he amongst other things  has managed to paint 2 dogs and a sail boat, which is not seen in Monet’s.

Art Reproduction

Fabulous Masterpieces has painted a lot of art reproductions of La Grenouillere over the years, below is an example of our Renoir La Grenouillere hand-painted in oils onto canvas.

Renoir La Grenouillere by Fabulous Masterpieces

Renoir's La Grenouillere by Fabulous Masterpieces

If you would like to purchase La Grenouillere by Renoir or Monet’s version please contact us or visit either the Monet online gallery or Renoir art reproduction page.

If you would like to know more about art reproduction, what it is, who buys them etc, visit our art reproduction question page, here.

Bye for now x

Anna

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How to tell if art is a reproduction

1. Archival Evidence

Research Research Research…..

Woman reading

Archival Evidence

Doing some research and getting your hands on documents that provide information about the painting or its earliest owners is clearly a good step in assessing if the painting you have or are looking to buy is an original or an art reproduction. Having information about how your painting was made and the historical and artistic context in which it was created will really be able to help you.

2. Scientific Investigation

joseph wright philosopher giving that lecture

Scientific Examinations

If you look at your painting, try and think: “Is the appearance, texture and pattern consistent with the artwork’s proposed age”? The back and sides of a painting are also good sources of information and can tell professionals about dating and provenance and even geographic origin of the painting in question. Scientific techniques such as X-radiography and infrared radiation can also help.

3. Art Knowledge

franz hals portrait of willem

Knowledge is Power

Having knowledge of historic techniques is also very helpful in discerning whether you have an original painting or an art reproduction. For example, with Renaissance paintings the majority were painted on panels. So knowing that before the 18th century, wood panels used for painting were finished by hand  (the backs of the paintings can still exhibit traces of tools that were used to work the wood), as opposed to after the 18th century when  machine sawn panels were used; already gives you an indication of when the painting was produced.

4. Labels

art reproduction

Most canvases and panels used for painting were prepared by specialist craftsmen as opposed to the actual artist and occasionally have labels or markings that identify the maker. To give you an example, wood panels produced in Brussels were frequently branded with the mark of the panel maker and city’s insignia, which can help you verify geographic origin and a rough date.

5. Colours

Franz Marc THE MANDRILL

Colours

In any given era, artists have a common range of pigments at their disposal. And it is the method of using these pigments mixtures and applying paint that experts can observe differences between periods within the era .  A coloured ground in your  painting can determine your painting’s approximate date – If you think you have a have a fifteenth century painting for example, experts could tell if a pigment in it was a 21st century synthetic pigment and therefore it’s a pretty straight forward way to detect whether your painting is an original or art reproduction.

Are you interested in purchasing an art reproduction?

art reproduction

If you would like some more  information on art replicas please visit the art reproduction page. Likewise, if you have a question or something to share please contact us or leave a comment.

Bye for now x

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Photographs from our Art Reproduction &

Portrait Exhibition

Were You There?

Last week, Fabulous Masterpieces held a networking and art exhibition at the Troubadour gallery with the best of Kensington & Chelsea in London. Thanks to all of you who came. It was a fab night and have uploaded some photographs of the evening. We will be organising another exhibition with the best of Kensington & Chelsea shortly so if you’re interested in attending a future event please do let us know.

To learn more about Fabulous Masterpieces, please visit us here

To learn more about the best of Kensington & Chelsea, please click here.

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So, You want an aged oil painting!

When we do art reproductions, especially for period houses, we are often asked to make sure that the paintings look like they were painted centuries ago. I remember we were once asked to paint Vermeer’s A Girl with a Pearl Earring  but to do so in such a way that the whole painting had to have a “cracked effect” (craquelure). I’ve attached the photo to show you exactly what I mean.  The customer loved it, and if that’s what you’re after, it’s very easy to do but personally I think it looks a bit contrived, so we’ve steered away from this technique.

Girl with a Pearl Earring

Girl with a Pearl Earring using the Craquelure technique

What do we do now then? Well, we use an art restorer here in London and the results are really fantastic. The oil painting has to be completely dry and this takes 6 months. So patience is definitely a virtue but it’s worth the wait. Once dry, amongst other things, the restorer mixes varnish with a brown paint, usually Van Dyke Brown and brushes it onto the painting. We can do this for you (if you want us to hold onto your painting until it is absolutely dry), but alternatively you could just take your painting to an art restorer yourself once it’s dry. It’s not expensive and your oil painting will look FABULOUS!

Aged Art Reproduction

Detail of oil painting by Fabulous Masterpieces. Painted in 2010 but looks centuries old!

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If you’re thinking about commissioning a fine art reproduction of an oil painting that you love there are some things that you need to look out for when browsing art reproduction websites.

1. Is there a postal address but more importantly a phone number that you can call that is clearly visible on their website?


If your art reproduction company is reputable they will have a phone number clearly displayed. I would strongly recommend avoiding companies that don’t. We have heard several horror stories from new customers who originally bought an art reproduction from a website with no address or phone number displayed and when problems arose such as a poor quality painting or the painting was damaged in transit etc there was nobody that they could call to talk to. Emails suddenly went unanswered and as there was no phone number listed to call or address shown, nothing could be done, resulting in people being left with an unsatisfactory painting that they could never display and money being thrown down the drain.  The lesson to learn here is make sure contact details are visibly displayed and better still call your chosen art reproduction company before ordering to talk through any concerns that you may have.

2. Does the art reproduction company comply with copyright law?

Van Gogh's Starry Night by Fabulous Masterpieces

I cannot tell you how many companies I have seen online that are offering customers the chance to buy copies of masterpieces that are still covered by copyright, and therefore illegal. These businesses know it too! Usually, these are the art replica companies that will not display a number or address so there is no way the authorities or DACS (the Design and Artists Copyright Society) would be able to prosecute them. Just so you know, in a nutshell any painting can be copied if the artist has been dead for 70 years. That means, any artist who has died prior to 1st January 1940 is perfectly legal to replicate (apart from the extremely  rare occasions whereby the estate of the late artist has successfully extended copyright). However, if you see a website offering to paint you a Rothko, Matisse or a Picasso (he died in 1973) for example, this is in breach of copyright law. And as for artists that are still alive, that is a huge no no. Yes, I know it’s annoying! Your favourite artist might be Picasso or Freud but do you really want to deal with an art reproduction company that is painting copies illegally? What will you do if there is a problem with your painting? The lesson to learn here is to deal with reputable art companies who comply with copyright law. Remember an artist needs to be dead for 70 years before you can legally commission a painting by him or her.

3. Does your art reproduction company have examples of their work shown on their website?

Charles Fortune's Mending Nets by Fabulous Masterpieces

Art Reproduction of Charles Fortune's Mending Nets by Fabulous Masterpieces

This is quite important as art reproduction is all about quality. For example on the Fabulous Masterpieces website there is a compare and contrast section, allowing people to compare the art reproductions to the original painting. There are also photos of Fabulous Masterpieces’ paintings in situ, which again shows people the quality that they can expect. The lesson to learn here is since just about all art reproduction companies are run solely online, you need to try and see as many examples of their paintings as you can, so you can make a judgement if the quality of their oil paintings is right for you. A lot of companies also make the claim that their art reproductions are “museum quality“! It’s true, Fabulous Masterpieces does make this claim, but we make that claim because museums commission our art reproductions due to their high quality. Do museums commission reproductions from your chosen art company, or is the claim simply hype? Whatever art company you decide to order from, just make sure you are happy with the quality of their work as when you receive your painting you want to not only enjoy it but be proud to display it in your home.

4.  Don’t pay peanuts but don’t pay over the odds.


When it comes to pricing, just do a Google search and you’ll see that prices for art reproductions can vary astonishingly. I once saw a reproduction oil painting of Van Gogh’s Sunflowers sold for £20 on ebay. £20! I was so amazed that I spent £20 of my hard earned money to see what a £20 replica oil painting would look like.  Well, it wouldn’t take Einstein to guess that the painting was dreadful.  It looked like something a 6 year old might paint and the smell was horrendous.  I have no idea what poor quality, cheap oils they used but it was not good. At the same time, I have seen art reproductions online starting from £1,500.  From a young age, we are told that we get what we pay for but £1500 for a standard size oil painting copy (50cm x 60cm) is extortionate.  Remember, this is not appreciable art, it is decorative art.  The lesson to learn here is shop around, make sure the quality of your oil painting justifies the price and very importantly, that you are getting good value for your money.

5. Will your art reproduction company post negative reviews as well as good on their website?


If you want to book a hotel, what do you do? Just about everybody I know goes onto Trip Adviser to read genuine reviews by people on their hotel experience to help them make an informed decision on what hotel they should stay with. If your art reproduction company does not have any testimonials posted on their website, then be careful, as you would have to ask, why? Aren’t any of their customers happy with their art reproductions? Secondly, does their website allow you to post not just good reviews but negative comments, or do they screen the reviews submitted and just post positive testimonials. You need to be wary if the reviews you are reading are all one sided and therefore not giving you an honest picture of the art reproduction company you are ordering from.

To give you an example of what to look out for, at Fabulous Masterpieces people can post reviews on an external site, the link of which is on the Fabulous Masterpieces website allowing people to read and review us. Whether positive or negative, all comments are posted, allowing you, the perspective customer to make an informed decision.  The lesson to learn here is making sure you are getting all the information, not just the biased bits.  Type the name of the art reproduction company into Google and see what people have said about them on forums or review websites. It pays to do research.

Have a question?

We’d love to hear from you! Please leave a comment or contact us via email: info@fabulousmasterpieces.co.uk or call us on: +44 (0)20 8354 9280.  Alternatively, visit our art reproduction website Fabulous Masterpieces by following the link. http://www.fabulousmasterpieces.co.uk 

Oh and Yup, we deliver world-wide too!

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